Timothy Trainer, Attorney
Timothy Trainer

As an attorney, Timothy Trainer focuses on intellectual property issues and has been engaged in that work for most of the past thirty years.  Living in the DC area, he has worked in government agencies and in the private sector.  His work has taken him to about 60 countries around the world. 

His experience at the U.S. Customs Service (now US Customs and Border Protection) and subsequent work has given him the knowledge base and background to co-author a reference book.  He and his co-author are preparing to have the 15 annual edition of Customs Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights.  They authored the last edition in 2020.

In 2015, Thomson Reuters’ Aspatore Books published Tim’s book Potato Chips to Computer Chips: The War on Fake Stuff

He has also dabbled in fiction writing.  His novel,  Pendulum Over the Pacific, was published by Joshua Tree Publishing in 2019. Pendulum’s political intrigue story is set in Tokyo and Washington, D.C. and centers on trade tensions between the U.S. and Japan in the late 1980s.


Email: Timothy Trainer
Books
Pendulum Over the Pacific

In Pendulum Over the Pacific, the President’s nephew and advisor goes rogue, teaming with a hawkish U.S. Senator who is scheming to force Japan to lower its trade surplus with the U.S. The senator and nephew see Japan’s trade surplus as a threat to the U.S. economy. They decide to manipulate facts and use history to their advantage to force the President to renegotiate an existing U.S.-Japan trade deal. It’s the 1980s when Japan was the “bad” trade partner, before China’s rise.

For more information, visit:
PendulumOverThePacific.com


The Fortunate Son

The Fortunate Son recounts the parallel lives of an army brat and a group of Vietnam veterans who intersect decades after the war. The veterans open up to me, the army brat, perhaps in a way they never have with their own families. Why? Through my father, Top, their First Sergeant, we have a common link. Over the years, we’ve gotten to know each other. They begin to understand the sacrifices of an army family. But, more importantly, they want me to understand how our family’s sacrifice and my father’s tour of duty in Vietnam with them, in the jungles, gave them confidence to believe they would make it home alive.

For more information, visit:
TheFortunateSon.com